Morgan Gleason: Transition to Adult Care

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Several years ago, Morgan Gleason shared a youth’s perspective of being a patient [LINK] in this video. Just last year she posted about being a chronic patient and transitioning to adult care.

Hey guys! I have officially been at Auburn University for a month, and man has it been a busy one (War eagle!). College is fun, exciting, and scary all at one time. You are meeting so many new people, while trying to figure out who you are and where you fit in. You are trying to balance your social life and make good grades at the same time. All of this is what a normal college student is going through. In my situation, I also have to balance my health on top of all this. While I’m still trying to figure out what this all means, I have a basic feel for what that entails. It is both strange and difficult to be solely responsible for your own healthcare.

I have always been more involved with my healthcare than your average teen. However, I have also always had my mom there to help me out. In my month and a half of being at college, I have gotten my infusion at the local adult hospital here.

Since I was diagnosed when I was 11, I have always gone to the same pediatric hospital and seen the same doctors and nurses who know everything there is to know about my health. Moving to a new state and having to go see a new rheumatologist where I don’t have the close relationship I had with my old one is tough. On top of that, I transitioned to adult care because now I am a legal adult as of August 24th. It also meant that I needed to go to my first adult doctor by myself, to meet my new rheumatologist on the day after my 18th birthday. The majority of pediatric doctors are very nurturing and are extra compassionate, as you have to be with kids. Adult doctors seem to be much more rigid.

However, there are pros and cons to pediatrics and adult medicine. The adult doctor that I have seen here is clearly much more used to involving his patients directly, rather than their parents or caregiver. He talked to me like I had something to say, and more like I was his equal. This could’ve been because I was very confident in telling him what I needed and what normally goes on with me during my infusions, but he seemed very understanding. He had to learn my entire very complex protocol for my IVIG. He had to learn everything about my long health history in just about an hour. After that appointment, which went very well, actually much better than I had expected, I was admitted to the hospital for my infusion. This also went very well, and I had no major drama which was fantastic….

Read the rest of Morgan’s insightful about transitioning to adult care.

Last Updated On September 20, 2018

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